Back to top

Women's Weaving Collective

Guatemala

Problem

Indigenous Ixil women living in the Quiché region of Guatemala endured 36 years of civil war. They were targeted with genocide, and many lost their homes and loved ones. Women still carry the burdens of those days. 

Today, many widows and single mothers are the sole breadwinners for their families. They continue to face discrimination as Indigenous women and are denied access to their rights and resources. They struggle to provide basic necessities for their children and to heal from the atrocities of the war.

Catarina Guatemala
Woman Weaving

Solution

MADRE’s local partner is an Indigenous women’s group called MUIXIL. Together with you, we support a weaving collective to help women raise income and preserve heritage.

Partner for Social Change
  • We give women the tools they need to sustain themselves and their families. We provide looms and the raw materials women need to produce and sell traditional weavings. This raises income for their families. What’s more, these weavings preserve the women’s Ixil heritage by passing down their traditional designs.
Guatemala Fabric
Advocate for Human Rights
  • We provide trainings that make human rights real and relevant to women. In this way, MADRE and MUIXIL equip Ixil women with tools and knowledge to take part in local elections and public life. They take steps to advocate for their rights globally and at home.
Guatemala Meeting
Results
  • By selling their weaving, women raise money to feed their families and send their children to school.
  • Survivors of genocide preserve and pass on their traditional heritage through unique weaving designs.
  • Women gain knowledge of their human rights and the skills to demand them in elections, national policymaking and before international human rights bodies.
Muixil Rooster

Partner

MUIXIL is a Guatemalan grassroots women's group that promotes the political, economic, and cultural rights of Ixil Mayan and other Indigenous women. 

Issue

Global women's rights around the world are essential to thriving local and global economies. Yet, their critical contributions, in the home and in their communities, are often undervalued.