Back to top

MADRE - Global women's rights 

Feminist Foreign Policy Jumpstart

To reboot the world, we need to change the way we make policies. That's why MADRE is launching an initiative to bring global women’s voices and solutions to progressive policymaking in the US.

We fund work to meet urgent needs in communities, enhance women's leadership and build strong local institutions.

We strengthen the skills of individuals and organizations to mobilize in communities, influence policies and sustain movements.

We mobilize our team of advocates and lawyers to train and accompany partners in shared campaigns for policy change.

Our grassroots partners are women leaders who protect and provide for communities facing war and disaster. Together, we build skills, strengthen local organizations and advance progressive movements. And we bring women's demands to policymakers and advocate for rights, resources and results.

Indigenous women delegation visits activists in Arizona

Watch Video

The Trump Administration has stepped up its assault on immigrants, refugees and Indigenous Peoples. In response, we brought a delegation of Indigenous women from all across the world to the US-Mexico border. They came together with Indigenous women and leaders in Arizona to exchange experiences and solutions. Watch a video that captures highlights of that visit.

The International Crimes Against Humanity Treaty

A new convention on crimes against humanity (CAH) is in its final draft stages, but most civil society groups — including women, LGBTIQ, disability, Indigenous, aboriginal, youth, caste, and racial and ethnic minority rights groups — have not weighed in. The CAH drafting process is moving quickly in the UN process, and now is a critical time to get involved.

A Timeline of Civil Society Intervention

The International Law Commission (ILC) completed its first reading of the draft articles for a new treaty on crimes against humanity (CAH). While the current treaty draft embraces strong language from the Rome Statute, including gender as a protected class from persecution, it also adopts an outdated and opaque definition of gender. A text that does not properly account for current understanding of gender could sideline women, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer (LGBTIQ) persons and other marginalized and vulnerable victims.